Robert Johnson

Robert Leroy Johnson (May 8, 1911 – August 16, 1938) was an American blues singer-songwriter and musician. His landmark recordings in 1936 and 1937 display a combination of singing, guitar skills, and songwriting talent that has influenced later generations of musicians. Johnson’s shadowy and poorly documented life and death at age 27 have given rise to much legend. One Faustian myth says that he sold his soul to the devil at a local crossroads of Mississippi highways to achieve success. As an itinerant performer who played mostly on street corners, in juke joints, and at Saturday night dances, Johnson had little commercial success or public recognition in his lifetime.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Johnson

The Mirror of Dharma

The Mirror of Dharma is an important, but often forgotten teaching in Buddhism. It is found in the “Last Days of The Buddha” suttra. Ananda, Buddha’s closest follower, is troubled by questions about what happened to other followers (Sanga) after they have died.

The Buddha responded to him:
“But truly, Ánanda, it is nothing strange that human beings should die. But if each time it happens you should come to the Tathágata and ask about them in this manner, indeed it would be troublesome to him. Therefore, Ánanda, I will give you the teaching called the Mirror of the Dhamma, possessing which the noble disciple, should he so desire, can declare of himself: ‘There is no more rebirth for me in hell, nor as an animal or ghost, nor in any realm of woe. A stream-enterer am I, safe from falling into the states of misery, assured am I and bound for Enlightenment.”

As we, or most people do, also Ananda has a very common attachment to questions about the afterlife. Questions that are troubling and imponderable. The teaching called the Mirror of the Dhamma will help to silence these troublesome ideas and feelings.

The Mirror of Dharma is a declaration:
”there is no more rebirth for me in hell, nor as an animal or ghost, nor in any realm of woe. A stream-enterer am I, safe from falling into the states of misery, assured am I and bound for Enlightenment.’

The declaration that this is my last life, my only life and there is no commitment to the idea of an afterlife or a beforelife. In thus taking away the need for questioning and attachment to the concept of after life or even life in it self.

The Mirror of the Dhamma

8. “But truly, Ánanda, it is nothing strange that human beings should die. But if each time it happens you should come to the Tathágata and ask about them in this manner, indeed it would be troublesome to him. Therefore, Ánanda, I will give you the teaching called the Mirror of the Dhamma, possessing which the noble disciple, should he so desire, can declare of himself: ‘There is no more rebirth for me in hell, nor as an animal or ghost, nor in any realm of woe. A stream-enterer am I, safe from falling into the states of misery, assured am I and bound for Enlightenment.'”

9. “And what, Ánanda, is that teaching called the Mirror of Dhamma, possessing which the noble disciple may thus declare of himself?

“In this case, Ánanda, the noble disciple possesses unwavering faith in the Buddha thus: ‘The Blessed One is an Arhat, the Fully Enlightened One, perfect in knowledge and conduct, the Happy One, the knower of the world, the paramount trainer of beings, the teacher of gods and men, the Enlightened One, the Blessed One.’

“He possesses unwavering faith in the Dhamma thus: ‘Well propounded by the Blessed One is the Dhamma, evident, timeless, inviting investigation, leading to emancipation, to be comprehended by the wise, each for himself.’

“He possesses unwavering faith in the Blessed One’s Order of Disciples thus: ‘Well faring is the Blessed One’s Order of Disciples, righteously, wisely, and dutifully: that is to say, the four pairs of men, the eight classes of persons. The Blessed One’s Order of Disciples is worthy of honor, of hospitality, of offerings, of veneration — the supreme field for meritorious deeds in the world.’

“And he possesses virtues that are dear to the Noble Ones, complete and perfect, spotless and pure, which are liberating, praised by the wise, uninfluenced (by worldly concerns), and favorable to concentration of mind.

10. “This, Ánanda, is the teaching called the Mirror of the Dhamma, whereby the noble disciple may thus know of himself: ‘there is no more rebirth for me in hell, nor as an animal or ghost, nor in any realm of woe. A stream-enterer am I, safe from falling into the states of misery, assured am I and bound for Enlightenment.'”

11. And also in Nadika, in the Brick House, the Blessed One often gave counsel to the Bhikkhus thus: “Such and such is virtue; such and such is concentration; and such and such is wisdom. Great becomes the fruit, great is the gain of concentration when it is fully developed by virtuous conduct; great becomes the fruit, great is the gain of wisdom when it is fully developed by concentration; utterly freed from the taints of lust, becoming, and ignorance is the mind that is fully developed in wisdom.”

12. When the Blessed One had stayed in Nadika as long as he pleased, he spoke to the Venerable Ánanda, saying: “Come, Ánanda, let us go to Vesali.”

“So be it, O Lord.” And the Blessed One took up his abode in Vesali together with a large community of Bhikkhus, and stayed in Ambapali’s grove.

Via: salted.net

Footnotes: How Running Makes Us Human

I want to be able to keep running as free and democratic as possible. I run because it gives me far too much that I couldn’t possibly not. It makes us more intelligent, de-stresses us, and makes us fitter. It gets us away from technology, allows our brains to rest, and encourages creativity. Running can be all that.

Running is not just a sport. It reconnects us to our bodies and the places in which we live, breaking down our increasingly structured and demanding lives. It allows us to feel the world beneath our feet, lifts the spirit, allows our minds out to play and helps us to slip away from the demands of the modern world.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/running-books-jogging-health-science/

Brain drain !!!

“the mere presence of these devices reduces available cognitive capacity”

Our smartphones enable—and encourage—constant connection to information, entertainment, and each other. They put the world at our fingertips, and rarely leave our sides. Although these devices have immense potential to improve welfare, their persistent presence may come at a cognitive cost.

Brain Drain: The Mere Presence of One’s Own Smartphone Reduces Available Cognitive Capacity

Just look around you — at the people crouched over their phones as they walk the streets, or drive their cars, or walk their dogs, or play with their children. Observe yourself in line for coffee, or in a quick work break, or driving, or even just going to the bathroom. Visit an airport and see the sea of craned necks and dead eyes. We have gone from looking up and around to constantly looking down.

I Used to Be a Human Being

Selbstbewertung

Die Selbstbewertung des Menschen beruht auf der Behauptung seiner Individualität. Dies folgt zu krankhaften „Luxusbildungen“ und der heutige Konsumgesellschaft und die Ausbeutung des Planeten zur Erhöhung des Lebensstandards. Mit als folgen die allgemeine und rasch um sich greifende Entfremdung von der lebenden Natur. Die Konsumgesellschaft trägt einen großen Teil der Schuld an der ästhetischen und ethischen Verrohung der Zivilisationsmenschen und das Abreißen von Traditionen.  – Konrad Lorenz