Stars

Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded. And the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star then your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics; you are all stardust. You couldn’t be here if stars hadn’t exploded, because the elements – the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, all things that matter for evolution at the start of life – weren’t created at the beginning of time. They were created in the nuclear furnaces of stars, and the only way for them to get into your body is if those stars are kind enough to explode. So, forget Jesus. The stars exploded so that you could be here today. Lawrence Krauss

Manipulation

Technology companies like Facebook, Google, Twitter and the like, have become from socially connecting people and entertaining platforms, to tools that are being used for undetectable and untraceable manipulations of entire populations, far beyond the imagination of their creators and the scope of existing regulations and laws. 

Maeda’s ten laws of simplicity

Simplicity

John Maeda’s Laws of Simplicity:

Law 1: Reduce
The Simplest way to achieve simplicity is through thoughtful reduction

Law 2: Organize
Organization makes a system of many appear fewer

Law 3: Time
Savings in time feel like simplicity

Law 4: Learn
Knowledge makes everything simpler

Law 5: Differences
Simplicity and complexity need each other

Law 6: Context
What lies in the periphery of simplicity is definitely not peripheral

Law 7: Emotion
More emotions are better than less

Law 8: Trust
In simplicity we trust

Law 9: Failure
Some things can never be made simple

Law 10: The One
Simplicity is about subtracting the obvious, and adding the meaningful

On Kindness

Today it is only between parents and children that kindness is expected, sanctioned, and indeed obligatory… Kindness — that is, the ability to bear the vulnerability of others, and therefore of oneself — has become a sign of weakness (except of course among saintly people, in whom it is a sign of their exceptionality)… All compassion is self-pity, D. H. Lawrence remarked, and this usefully formulates the widespread modern suspicion of kindness: that it is either a higher form of selfishness (the kind that is morally triumphant and secretly exploitative) or the lowest form of weakness (kindness is the way the weak control the strong, the kind are only kind because they haven’t got the guts to be anything else). If we think of humans as essentially competitive, and therefore triumphalist by inclination, as we are encouraged to do, then kindness looks distinctly old-fashioned, indeed nostalgic, a vestige from a time when we could recognize ourselves in each other and feel sympathetic because of our kind-ness… And what, after all, can kindness help us win, except moral approval; or possibly not even that, in a society where “respect” for personal status has become a leading value.

http://www.brainpickings.org/2015/07/13/on-kindness-adam-phillips-barbara-taylor/