Straight Edge

The German Spiegel website is running an article about “straight edge”, a punk movement from the early eighties. Basically the Straight Edge idea’s are:

Don’t smoke
Don’t drink
Don’t fuck
At least I can fucking think
I can’t keep up
Can’t keep up
Can’t keep up
Out of step with the world

These principles simply stand for respect for your own mind and body as well
as for the opposite sex and your fellows. A clear mind should allow humans to perceive the
world around them better and to recognice and to fight against deplorable
states of affairs in their social surroundings. This can be of ethic-moral,
ecologic or politic nature or can simply include problems from your very own
personal surroundings….

Interesting to see that a idealistic movement gets some attention after 20 Years,
specially in a time where most of the youngsters going mostly over the edge.


Now reading: Zen: The Path of Paradox

It took me 2 Days to read this nice Zen related book from Osho. In Zen: The Path of Paradox, Osho suggests Zen as a possible bridge between East and West, and between the scientific and the spiritual. “Without science,” Osho said, “the East has lost much; without meditation, the West has lost much. I am trying to bring together East and West, because together they will create the whole.” Osho encourages the reader to throw off the accumulated “knowing” of a lifetime–to let go of physical, mental, and emotional tensions, to relax into the flow of an extraordinary discourse and become receptive to the present moment and the potential within.

Moving Mind.

Two men were arguing about a flag flapping in the wind. “It’s the wind that is really moving,” stated the first one. “No, it is the flag that is moving,” contended the second. A Zen master, who happened to be walking by, overheard the debate and interrupted them. “Neither the flag nor the wind is moving,” he said, “It is MIND that moves.”

Tao in the Tao Te Ching.

Tao is referred to in many ways in the Tao Te Ching. There are different shades of meanings in the various translations of this great work, which, with over 100 translations, is perhaps the most translated Chinese text in the English language. Here is one translation of the first stanza, describing Tao:
The Tao that can be told is not the eternal Tao;
The name that can be named is not the eternal name.
The nameless is the beginning of heaven and earth.
The named is the mother of ten thousand things.
Ever desireless, one can see the mystery.
Ever desiring, one can see the manifestations.
These two spring from the same source but differ in name;
this appears as darkness.
Darkness within darkness.
The gate to all mystery.

At Amazon: Tao Books

Tao (the Way, or one’s doctrine).

The concept of Tao is based upon the understanding that the only constant in the universe is change, (ie. I Ching, the “Book of Changes”) and that we must understand and be in harmony with this change. The change is a constant flow from non-being into being, potential into actual, yin into yang, female into male. The symbol of the Tao, called the Taijitu, is the yin yang confluently flowing into itself in a circle. More in Wikipedia or at the Amazon bookstore: Tao Books