John Coltrane


John Coltrane – My Favorite Things 1961 von Yedi

It was Friday, July 21, and unexpectedly I collided with the sorrow of an age. John Coltrane, the man who gave us A Love Supreme, had died. Scores of people were gathering across from St. Peter’s Church to say goodbye. Hours passed. People were sobbing as the love cry of Albert Ayler spirited the atmosphere. It was if a saint had died, one who had offered up healing music yet was not permitted to heal himself. Along with many strangers, I experienced a deep sense of loss for a man I had not known save through his music. (Patti Smith, Just Kids)

The Known Universe

The Known Universe takes viewers from the Himalayas through our atmosphere and the inky black of space to the afterglow of the Big Bang. Every star, planet, and quasar seen in the film is possible because of the world’s most complete four-dimensional map of the universe, the Digital Universe Atlas that is maintained and updated by astrophysicists at the American Museum of Natural History. The new film, created by the Museum, is part of an exhibition, Visions of the Cosmos: From the Milky Ocean to an Evolving Universe, at the Rubin Museum of Art in Manhattan through May 2010.

Data: Digital Universe, American Museum of Natural History
http://www.haydenplanetarium.org/universe/

Visualization Software: Uniview by SCISS

Director: Carter Emmart
Curator: Ben R. Oppenheimer
Producer: Michael Hoffman
Executive Producer: Ro Kinzler
Co-Executive Producer: Martin Brauen
Manager, Digital Universe Atlas: Brian Abbott

Music: Suke Cerulo

For more information visit http://www.amnh.org

Listening to: Moby: Destroyed

File Destroyedmoby

The majority of the recording was done while Moby was touring. He’d stay up in his hotel room because of his insomnia and work on music at odd times of day such as two in the morning. He said “it seemed as if everyone else in the world is sleeping.” He would take any incomplete tracks back to his apartment, where, using his collection of unique instruments, he would finish them. His friends Emily Zuzik, Inyang Bassey, and Joy Malcom (as well as Moby himself) sang on the record.[3] Musically, Moby summed it up as “broken down melodic electronic music for empty cities at 2 am.” He says the title of the album makes sense when he listens to the music. Moby: Destroyed. Great Album, great Web site !

@ Amazon: Destroyed
@ Wikipedia: Destroyed

The Music on the Hill

“The worship of Pan never has died out,” said Mortimer. “Other newer gods have drawn aside his votaries from time to time, but he is the Nature-God to whom all must come back at last. He has been called the Father of all the Gods, but most of his children have been stillborn.”

The Music on the Hill.

A Spring in Autumn

Behind a ribbon of evening mist, a chill sky distills,
and a melody of far waterfalls like ten silk strings
comes to my pillow to tug my feelings,
keeping me awake in sorrow past midnight.

Xue Tao was well-respected as a poet during the Tang Dynasty, when she lived. She was born either in the Tang capital Zhangan or later on when her father, a minor government official, was posted to Chengdu in present-day Sichuan province. A story about her childhood, perhaps apocryphal, suggests that she was able to write complex poems by the age of seven or eight. She may have gained some literary education from her father, but he died before she had come to marriageable age and she ended up being a very successful courtesan (one of the few paths for women in Tang Dynasty China in which conversation and artistic talent were encouraged). After Wei Gao, the military governor, became her literary patron, her reputation was widespread. She seems to have had an affair with another famous literary figure, Yuan Zhen. Late in life she went to live in seclusion and put on the habit of a Taoist churchwoman. More than one hundred of her poems survive. She is often considered (with Yu Xuanji) to be one of the two finest female poets of the Tang Dynasty.

Spring Gazing

Flowers bloom but we can’t share them.
Flowers fall and we can’t share our sadness.
If you need to find when I miss you most:
when the flowers bloom and when they fall.

I pull a blade of grass and tie a heart-shape knot
to send to the one who understands my music.
Spring sorrow is at the breaking point.
Again spring birds murmur sad songs.

Wind, flowers, and the day is aging.
No one knows when we’ll be together.
If I can’t tie my heart to my man’s,
it’s useless to keep tying heart-shaped knots.

Unbearable when flowers fill the branches,
when two people miss each other.
Tears streak my morning mirror like jade chopsticks.
Does the spring wind know that?

American hardcore –

the history of American Punkrock 1980 bis 86, looks like a nice movie, that is if you where a part of this 1980’s subculture, and digg bands like Black Flag, DRI, Bad Brains.

American hardcore

SYNOPSIS

Generally unheralded at the time, the early 1980s hardcore punk rock scene gave birth to much of the rock music and culture that followed. There would be no Nirvana, Beastie Boys or Red Hot Chili Peppers were it not for hardcore pioneers such as Black Flag, Bad Brains and Minor Threat.

Hardcore was more than music

Get it here

Punks on Drugs

“I can’t understand why anybody should devote their lives to a cause like dope. It’s the most boring pastime I can think of. It ranks a close second to TV.” ~ Frank Zappa

“Frank Zappa is probably the single most untalented person I’ve heard in my life. He’s two-bit, pretentious, academic and he can’t play his way out of anything. He can’t play rock n’ roll because he’s a loser. And that’s why he dresses so funny. He’s not happy with himself and I think he’s right” ~ Lou Reed

music ruined my life: V.A. Punks on Drugs.

Wynton Marsalis on technology

“I don’t think we should feel that because our tools have become more advanced, we are more advanced. The technology of the soul has not changed for a long time. Many times we use technological advances to stand in for we are more advanced. Jazz is not like that. You can come up with all the synthesizers you want, it’s still not going to be able to swing….This music celebrates human beings and our creativity.” — Wynton Marsalis