What Yoda can teach us about training

By Hanz on May 12, 2013 — 4 mins read

Luke: All right, I’ll give it a try.
Yoda: No. Try not. Do… or do not. There is no try.

We train to learn what we can and cannot do and we train to learn to push our limits. By training, the body responds to exercise with a coordinated effort from many systems, including working muscles, the heart, lungs, blood vessels and others. If muscles are used regularly then their mass grows and they become stronger and training learns the body to be more effective with fuel resources. By regularly training the body learns to be more efficient and to be more effective. Training gives the body strength and experience to deal with physical stress. Training teaches us determination. Do it, or do not. There is no try.

Luke: I don’t, I don’t believe it.
Yoda: That is why you fail.

Train your feet and train your mind. Disciple and training learns us to be confident and to believe in our strenght. By training and pushing in training we learn our limits and we also learn that we are able to push our limits. Next to that we learn to believe in our strength, we develop a mindset that is able to cope with challenges. If we are not confident in our self, we are not able to keep our self motivated. Without motivation, and self believe we won’t be able to push our self when things get hard. If you don’t believe in yourself you will fail.

Yoda: A Jedi must have the deepest commitment, the most serious mind.

It takes discipline to go out 5 or 6 days a week, to run in any weather. It takes discipline and commitment to live healthy, eat good and go to bed early all in order to body to rest and to recover for the next training. But when you are committed and you can stick to the training throughout the many years, then will power is no longer a problem. You just do it. It’s raining? That doesn’t matter. I am tired? Who cares! Just do it. Mood is not important, What does it have to do with it? Nothing, You fight when the necessity arises no matter the mood! Mood’s a thing for cattle or making love or playing the music. It’s not for training. Discipline and commitment, is all it takes.

Yoda: Named must your fear be before banish it you can.
Yoda: Only different in your mind

Self-Reflection should be part of all training. We make mistakes both on and off the trail. Sometimes mistakes result from trying new things in training, from getting angry or frustrated during a race, or from losing focus on the task at hand. No matter the cause of the mistake, mistakes are a normal aspect of development and can be great learning experiences; learning from those mistakes is how we improve. In order to learn from the mistakes we need to develop the skill of self-reflection. Self-reflection is exactly what it sounds like: reflecting on yourself—your thoughts, words, and actions. Self-reflection is what drives your “current” self to grow into your “ideal” self—the runner you aspire to be. Simply making mistakes will not help you grow; you must be aware of the mistakes and your responses and plan your best responses.

Yoda: This one a long time have I watched. All his life has he looked away to the future, to the horizon. Never his mind on where he was. Hmm? What he was doing.

In order to train and to run efficient we need to bring your mindful and focussed attention to your running. By clearing our mind of all distracting thoughts we will be able to bring our self fully into this present moment and run with less energy consumption; The brain accounts for less than 2% of a person’s weight, it consumes 20% of the body’s energy. During the run sense your self, your breathing, breathing is a good way to orient for mindfulness. Enlist all your senses as you keep your attention focused on where you are and what you are doing. Only When you run mindfully you will be able to remove unwanted and also negative thoughts from your mind. Mindfully running helps us to direct the body energy more efficiently and learns us to preserve energy for our movement.

Yoda: Fear is the path to the dark side. Fear leads to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to suffering.

The fear of failing can be immobilizing it can cause us to do nothing, and therefore resist moving forward. But when we allow fear to stop our forward progress in life, we’re likely to miss some great opportunities along the way. It’s important to realize that in everything we do, there’s always a chance that we’ll fail. Facing that chance, and embracing it, is not only courageous – it also gives us a fuller, more rewarding life. We can fight our fear with positive thinking. Positive thinking is an incredibly powerful way to build self-confidence and neutralize self-sabotage. Positive thinking doesn’t mean that you keep your head in the sand and ignore life’s less pleasant situations. Positive thinking just means that you approach the unpleasantness in a positive and and fearless way. No fear!

Yoda: May the force be with you.

Posted in: Buddhism, Mind, Running

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