Postponed…

If anything affects your eye, you hasten to have it removed; if anything affects your mind, you postpone the cure for a year. — [[Horace]] , 20 BC

Footnotes: How Running Makes Us Human

I want to be able to keep running as free and democratic as possible. I run because it gives me far too much that I couldn’t possibly not. It makes us more intelligent, de-stresses us, and makes us fitter. It gets us away from technology, allows our brains to rest, and encourages creativity. Running can be all that.

Running is not just a sport. It reconnects us to our bodies and the places in which we live, breaking down our increasingly structured and demanding lives. It allows us to feel the world beneath our feet, lifts the spirit, allows our minds out to play and helps us to slip away from the demands of the modern world.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/running-books-jogging-health-science/

Masses are rude

“Masses are rude, lame, unmade, pernicious in their demands and influence… I wish not to concede anything to them, but to tame, drill, divide, and break them up, and draw individuals out of them.”

Quote from [[Emerson]] out of a must read article on the great Brainpickings.org website.

The Buddha Mind

The Buddha Mind, unborn and marvelously illuminating, is like a bright mirror. A mirror reflects whatever is in front of it. It’s not deliberately trying to reflect things, but whatever comes before the mirror, its color and form are sure to appear. Likewise, when the object being reflected is removed, the mirror isn’t deliberately trying not to reflect it, but when it’s taken away it doesn’t appear in the mirror.

The Unborn Buddha Mind is just like this. It’s natural that you see and hear things, whatever they are, when you deliberately try to see and hear them; but when you see and hear things that you hadn’t originally anticipated seeing or hearing, it’s through the dynamic function of the Buddha Mind that every one of you has. That’s what’s meant by the Unborn Buddha Mind.

Zen master Bankei Yōtaku (1622-93)